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PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING /

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FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION /

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FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION /

SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION /

CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION /

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RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH / RESEARCH /

STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY / STRATEGY /

EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION / EXPERIMENTATION /

CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION / CREATIVE DIRECTION /

PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING / PROTOTYPING /

SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION / SPECULATION /

FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION / FACILITATION /

COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION /

Jonas Voigt (b. 1992, Germany) believes that the ways design inquiry tackles wicked problems helps to shape relationships between humans, non-humans, technologies and ecologies. It is a commitment that underpins Jonas's work as a freelance design strategist, researcher, and as educator. This obligation has been shaped by transdisciplinary experiences and collaborations made across institutions in Germany and North America.

He is an alumnus of the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Imaginative Mobilities and of the Design Realities Studio at The New School in New York. He recently taught in Integrated Design (BFA) and in Strategic Design and Management (BBA) at Parsons School for Design Strategies. Currently, he is involved at Grey Noise Studio and The Complicity

Jonas holds an MFA in Transdisciplinary Design from Parsons School of Design (USA), a BA in Communication Design from Hochschule für Gestaltung in Schwäbisch Gmünd (Germany), and studied Sustainable Design Strategies at Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver (Canada). 

Jonas’s work has been featured, exhibited and awarded internationally. Notable features include publications in Form, Core77, WIRED and BBC Future. Exhibitions at the Vitra Design Museum, Walker Art Center, Vienna Biennale, and XXII Triennale di Milano.

Permanent collections include The New School Libraries & Archives, Design Museum Holon and Philadelphia Museum of Art.


Feel free to get in touch and say hello.



Capabilities


Design-led Research
Participatory Action Research
Visual Communication
Creative & Art Direction
Stakeholder Alignment
Actionable Foresight Strategy
Strategic Planning
Scenario Development
Service Design
User Experience
Ethnography
Systems Thinking
Research Synthesis
Applied Phenomenology
Workshop Design
Facilitation
Rapid Prototyping
Human-Centered Design
Monitoring & Evaluation



Impact Areas


Social Impact Innovation
Community-led Development
Environmental Justice
Education & Capacity Building
Participatory Policy
Social & Restorative Justice
Transportation
Actionable Futures
Digital Equity






Imprint


Full CV available upon request.

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Unless otherwise indicated, all materials are copyrighted by Jonas Voigt, 2021.

Selection of Projects

2015 — 2019




Post Social: Towards design beyond the human


Design Research, 2019

Forthcoming in “NERD - New Experimental Research in Design” edited by Michael Erlhoff and Wolfgang Jonas, Birkhäuser, 2021.


Abstract


Human activity has unprecedentedly transformed Planet Earth, the atmosphere, the surface, and ecosystems. Today, all living and non-living beings are facing ecosystem collapses. If one does not rapidly quetion contemporary living, thinking and making, all beings will have to face environmental degradation as never experienced before.
        Contemporary design discourse aims to understand complexity by utilizing systems thinking. Pursuing to holistically understand the conditions in which design projects are mostly human-, or user-centered. This limited understanding of context through the lens of the human is reproducing unintended adverse, like the co-creation of climate change.
        In contrary, Post-Social Design advocates towards understanding that we are nature and that being natural always means to be more than just human. It proposes a paradigm shift within the discipline that fosters inclusivity of non-human entities and the acknowledgment of interconnectedness. Research on urban forests showed the street tree’s loss of social capacities, as trees reside in isolation of each other. Soil-exchange practices embrace the complexity to think of alternative realities to foster ontological and ecological transitions towards interrelatedness.


Excerpt


“Design, stripped to its essence, can be defined as the human capacity to shape and make our environment in ways without precedent in nature, to serve our needs and give meaning to our lives.”1


The notion of ‘social design’ and ‘human-centered design’ require urgent redefinition. Post-Social Design advocates for inclusivity of non-human entities and the acknowledgment of interconnectedness of human and nature in the design discourse. The term society descends on the Latin word sŏcĭĕtas, meaning “fellowship, association, union, community, society (implying union for a common purpose).”2 The term society used without an article implies the entirety of humanity. It derived from the noun sŏcĭo (social), describing “to join or unite together, to associate; to do or hold in common, or to share a thing with another".3 The definition relates, again, to the interaction between parties of human entities.
        Post-Social Design is in line with Bruno Latour’s critiques of “the sociology of the social”, the usage of society to study society. He proposes a “sociology of association” (actor-network theory) which tries to study the association of agents, the relational settings of elements (or non-human and human beings). The social becomes a principle of connections, rather than the context of existence.4
        Post-Social Design uses the term post, referring to of time, afterward, after, later, to introduce a makeshift in design, post the era of human-centricity, and calls for embracement of Latour’s notion of relationality and the inclusion of more-than-human entities. The term “Post-Social Design” provides an alternative and expands towards beyond the human and necessarily to the posthuman. The ambition of this ontological claim might bring clarity and theoretical productivity towards new processes and research in design. Post-social communities are posthuman unions, which are grounded by the coexistence on this planet.
        The concept of the “the posthuman,” stands for, as Laura Forlano identified, “the non-human, the multispecies, the anthropocene, the more than human, the transhuman and the decentering of the human.”5 Forlano points out that humanity will be adaptable with its methods, frameworks, and practices while engaging with “non-human knowledge and ways of being in the world.” She further argues that an expanded “understandings of the multiple agencies, dependencies, entanglements, and relations” will emerge.6 She concludes that related practices are not yet developed and grounding posthuman theory in practice has yet to be done. In short, Design must engage with epistemological and ontological concerns.
        Post-Social Design “must transcend the limitations of human-centered design.”7 With “Post-Social” I refer to a society that extends beyond the human, as Eduardo Kohn writes: “Beyond […] exceeds, at the same time that it is continuous with, its subject matter; [design] beyond the human is still about the human, even though and precisely because it looks to that which lies beyond it—a “beyond” that also sustains the human.”8 Post-Social Design addresses the meaning of humanity not in separation but in relation to nature and culture. As we now understand that everything is being designed, even “the climate, processes, and refugee camps,”9 it is about time to acknowledge worlds’ interdependency.   This intention advocates for a “new social design”10 practice, which “specificity lies in its definition of social as its [relationality] rather than in the objects it ends up creating.”11 Its early stages sit in-between “agnostic design” and “design activism”. Its outcomes “are strange and [it uses] interventions that lead to debate.”12 Its modes are manifested not so much in the artifacts of practices, but more in the performative aspects of interventions in the public. A public of “disruptions”13 in which multispecies co-existence provoke and “reframe the relation between [entities].”14 The Post-Social Design paradigm thus emerges in the global search for rapid change and multi-species cohabitation. It sates itself as an essential pursuit worthy of further investigation.15



Furthermore, have social scientists and theorists never earnestly considered the design discipline and its implications across scales. Escobar notes, that “designers have gone about their task without sufficient critical awareness of the fundamental fact that what they do indelibly shapes the kinds of subjects we become, the ecologies we inhabit, what we enable or destroy.”16
        Anne-Marie Willies describes this notion as ontological design: “We design our world, while our world acts back on us and designs us.”17 The French philosopher, anthropologist and sociologist Bruno Latour expresses in the proceedings of the 2008 annual international conference of the design history society:

“What is more, design has been extended from the details of daily objects to cities, landscapes, nations, cultures, bodies, genes, and, as [he] will argue, to nature itself – which is in great need of being re-designed.”18



Cited Work


1 Heskett, John. Design: A very short introduction. Vol. 136. Oxford University Press, 2005.

2 Lewis, Charlton Thomas, William Freund, and Charles Short. A Latin dictionary: founded on Andrews' edition of Freund's Latin dictionary. Clarendon Press, 1969.
3 Short, Charles, Ethan Allen Andrews, William Freund, and Charlton Thomas Lewis. A Latin dictionary: founded on Andrews' edition of Freund's Latin dictionary. Clarendon Press, 1879.
4 Latour, Bruno. Reassembling the Social: An Introduction to Actor-Network-Theory. Oxford: Oxford University Press USA - OSO, 2005. Accessed May 4, 2019. ProQuest Ebook Central, 4-15.
5 Forlano, Laura. "Posthumanism and design." She Ji: The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation 3, no. 1 (2017): 16-29, 17.
6 Forlano, Laura. "Posthumanism and design." She Ji: The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation 3, no. 1 (2017): 16-29, 17.
7 Faste, Haakon. "A Post-Human World Is Coming. Design Has Never Mattered More." Fast Company. July 10, 2018. Accessed April 29, 2019. https://www.fastcompany.com/3060742/a-post-human-world-is-coming-design-has-never-mattered-more.
8 Kohn, Eduardo. How forests think: Toward an anthropology beyond the human. University of California Press, 2013.
9 von Borries, Friedrich. To Project the World: Towards a Political Theory of Design. Suhrkamp Verlag, 2016.
10 Koskinen, Ilpo. "Agonistic, convivial, and conceptual aesthetics in new social design." Design Issues 32, no. 3 (2016): 18-29.
11 Koskinen, Ilpo. "Agonistic, convivial, and conceptual aesthetics in new social design." Design Issues 32, no. 3 (2016): 18-29, 18.
12 Koskinen, Ilpo. "Agonistic, convivial, and conceptual aesthetics in new social design." Design Issues 32, no. 3 (2016): 18-29, 28.
13+14 Rancière, Jacques. Aesthetics and its Discontents. Polity, 2009, 72.

15 Koskinen, Ilpo. "Agonistic, convivial, and conceptual aesthetics in new social design." Design Issues 32, no. 3 (2016): 18-29, 29.
16 Escobar, Arturo. "Arturo Escobar On His Book Designs for the Pluriverse: Radical Interdependence, Autonomy, and the Making of Worlds." Rorotoko. April 22, 2018. Accessed April 05, 2019. http://rorotoko.com/interview/20180423_escobar_arturo_on_book_designs_pluriverse_radical_interdependence/?page=4.
17 Willis, Anne-Marie. "Ontological designing." Design philosophy papers4, no. 2 (2006): 69-92, 70. 18 Latour, Bruno. "A cautious Prometheus? A few steps toward a philosophy of design (with special attention to Peter Sloterdijk)." In Proceedings of the 2008 annual international conference of the design history society, pp. 2-10. 2008.


Special Thanks


Jason Stein (Advanced Volunteer Coordinator, Parks Stewardship), Peter Lechnir (Forest Restoration Project Leader), and Dylan Di Luccio (Community Organizer) at New York City Department of Parks and Recreation.

Thanks to John Bruce, Anthony Dunne, Jamer Hunt, Fiona Raby, and Joey Lee. Further thanks to the faculty advisors Patricia Beirne, Elliott Montgomery, Lara Penin, Eduardo Staszowski, Jilly Traganou, and Anna Matthiesen.



An Archive Of Impossible Objects: Globes


Speculative Design, 2019

Exhibited at the Centre Pompidou (2020) and Kunstmuseen Krefeld (2019).  


Globes


The Globes are a commission from the Kunstmuseen Krefeld for its contribution to the Germany-wide Bauhaus100 program in 2019, marking the centennial anniversary of the Bauhaus:
     

“Living and dwelling go hand in hand. Countless different forms of domestic interiors are situated between the beautiful living environments featured in lifestyle magazines and public housing, between individual home design and visionary social models.”



In the late 1920s, the international architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886–1969) designed Haus Lange and Haus Esters in Krefeld—two villas that merge the personal style of their inhabitants and the architect’s own utopian aspirations. How did one live in these houses in the past, how mobile is our present-day society and what forms of living can be expected in the future are the main themes of the “Alternatives For Living” project. For this the Mies villas will be converted into a discussion platform. Sixteen international artists, architects and designers will realize innovative living and dwelling concepts for the two houses as well as the garden area.
       Our contribution focused on the globe. Today, as a domestic object, the globe is almost a form of kitsch, but we found its status as one of the oldest conceptual models of our world, made physical, fascinating. Rather than focusing on one world, ours, we identified other worlds from literature, amateur thought experiments and the fringes of science that represent different kinds of imaginations, all co-existing, jostling for room within one space. Three imaginary topographical maps accompany the globes, something we’d like to develop in future with other collaborators. Each map makes use of conventional markings, but don’t quite make sense, suggesting different kinds of atmosphere, climate, geology, forces, and fields to those shaping our world.


Special thanks


Anthony Dunne, Project Lead
Fiona Raby, Project Lead
— Katia Baudin, Director
— Sylvia Martin, Associate Director
— Magdalena Holzhey, Curator of Collections
— Julia Reich
Carolyn Kirscher, Design Assistance
Devon Reina, Design Assistance

︎ Project website Dunne & Raby
︎ Exhibition information
︎ Curators Statement (+ in EN)




Bahnhof Oberhafen


Transformation Design, 2020

Konzeptidee für “Gesellschaft der Ideen” 2020 des Bundesministerius für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF).


Das Herzstück des Areals ist die alte Gleishalle


Das Oberhafenquartier ist nicht wie der Name vermuten lässt ein alter Hafen, sondern ein ehemaliger Güterbahnhof der am Oberhafenkanal liegt. Noch bis 2014 war das Areal als Bahnfläche gewidmet – hier wurde Stückgut verladen, in den großzügigen Hallen gelagert und auf LKWs weiter transportiert. 2015 ging die Fläche in das Sondervermögen Stadt und Hafen über, die Gleise wurden entfernt und seitdem bleibt die Fläche weitgehend leer.

A multidisciplinary Think & Do Tank for Transformation Design and Research.



"Die alte Gleishalle verzaubert fast jede*n der sie betritt. Sie ist immer wieder Ort für Veranstaltungen, wie das jährlich stattfindende VRHAM-Festival, ein Festival für Virtuelle Realität und Kunst. Auch für Videodrehs und Events wird die Halle oft angefragt.
        Die Hürden für die Nutzung sind jedoch relativ hoch: die Einrichtung einer Absturzsicherung, ein immer wieder zu stellender Bauantrag, etc. Daher wird nach einem Konzept gesucht, welches es ermöglicht die Halle niederschwellig und für vielfältige Nutzungen zugänglich zu machen."


DIE VISION: GENERATIONSÜBERGREIFENDER DO-IT-TOGETHER KULTUR

Hand & Kopfbahnhof



Die Idee basiert auf zwei Beobachtungen


  1. In der Stadt wird Kultur meist konsumiert und nicht selbst Produziert
  2. Kulturelle Veranstaltungen sind meist auf eine klar und umgrenzte Zielgruppe zugeschnitten. Jung und Alt begegnen sich kaum."


Unsere Thesen

  • Wenn Menschen aus verschiedenen Generationen gemeinsam Ideen umsetzen, entsteht eine neue Qualität des Austausches, der für beide Seiten bereichend ist.
  • Wenn Menschen die Möglichkeit haben, ihre Ideen für Stadtkultur niedrigschwellig zu testen und umzusetzen bereichert das das kulturelle Leben der ganzen Stadt.
  • Wenn Alt und Jung gemeinsam Kulturangebote ins Leben rufen, werden diese inklusiver und innovativer sein. Die vielfältigen Lebenswelten, Sozialisationen, Erfahrungswerte und Kompetenzen inspirieren sich gegenseitig und profitieren voneinander.



Wir fragen uns

  • Was passiert wenn man einen Ort schafft, an dem Menschen verschiedener Generationen kulturelle Angebote nicht nur gemeinsam nutzen, sondern selbst schaffen?
  • Wie können Menschen Ideen im Team entwickeln, ausprobieren und so von Konsumierenden zu Produzierenden unterschiedlicher, kultureller Angebote werden?



Jung und alt im Oberhafen
Potentiale für Synergien "Die Veranstalter und Vereine im Oberhafen stellen ein vielseitiges Programm auf die Beine. Es gibt zahlreiche kulturelle Angebote die von allen Generationen genutzt werden. Doch auch hier: es gibt kaum Veranstaltungen die von allen gleichermaßen genutzt werden. Das soll sich durch den Hand & Kopfbahnhof ändern.
        Mit unserem Projekt Hand & Kopfbahnhof möchten wir gezielt Menschen aller Altersgruppen aktivieren und mobilisieren, sich aktiv am kulturellen Leben ihrer Stadt zu beteiligen. Wir wollen zur Stärkung der Intergenerationalität und zur demokratischen Gestaltung von Stadt beitragen.
        Die Teilhabenden an dieser sozialen Innovation erleben welches Potenzial die Zusammenarbeit verschiedener Generationen haben kann: Sie machen wertvolle Erfahrungen des Miteinanders, des voneinander Lernens und fördern so das Verständnis füreinander.


Eine Idee — viele Forschungsfragen

Was muss getan werden damit Menschen diesen Raum gemeinsam nutzen können? Was animiert Menschen verschiedener Generationen hierher zu kommen und den Raum zu bespielen? Wie genau müssen Raum und Infrastruktur aussehen, damit Menschen eigene kulturelle Angebote auf die Beine stellen können? Was begünstigt intergenerationale Teamarbeit?
        Wir haben Lust hier etwas auf die Beine zu stellen, aber wir sind auch begeisterte Forscher*innen und wollen gemeinsam mit weiteren Menschen aus Wissenschaft und Forschung den vielfältigen Fragen die sich hier bieten auf den Grund gehen.
        Unser Projekt bietet vielfältige Anknüpfungspunkte für vielerlei wissenschaftliche Fragestellungen aus unterschiedlichsten Disziplinen. Angefangen von der Erforschung von Co-Design Prozessen, über generationsübergreifende Teamarbeit bis hin zu der Frage was Menschen zur Beteiligung aktiviert. Das Projekt kann z.B. aus soziologischer, designtheoretischer, städteplanerischer, psychologischer und künstlerischer Perspektive erforscht werden.



Ein Reallabor für generationsverbindende Stadtkultur
Unser Ziel ist ein wirtschaftlich tragfähiges Konzept für einen Raum zu gestalten, in dem Menschen allen Alters niedrigschwellig und vor allem mit viel Spaß Ideen ausprobieren können, kollektive Intelligenz erleben, Austausch und Selbstwirksamkeit erfahren können.
        Hier sollen Erfahrungswerte gesammelt und Praxiswissen generiert werden, welche die Verstetigung des Projektes ermöglichen und auch auf andere Orten übertragbar sind.
        Um das zu Realisieren brauchen wir Zeit und Ressourcen. Sie mögen uns Unterstützen? Wir freuen uns auf ihre Nachricht!



PS: Gute Rahmenbedingungen auch in Corona-Zeiten

Die Kontaktbeschränkungen zur Eindämmung des Corona-Virus haben die Kultureinrichtungen hart getroffen. Das was in vielen Veranstaltungsorten die Regel ist: Menschen dicht auf dicht, in geschlossenen Räumen, führt nun dazu dass viele kulturelle Angebote nicht stattfinden können. Hier bietet die Gleishalle als Ort für Kultur bessere Voraussetzungen: viel Platz, eine gute Durchlüftung und verschiedene Wege die in die Halle und aus ihr heraus führen. Die Gleishalle kann sich flexibel an verschiedene Vorgaben anpassen.


Credits


Oberhafen 5+1 e.V.
Gesellschaft der Ideen (BMBF)

The Complicity


︎︎︎